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Jazz Blues Club » Music » Jazz » BeBop » Hard-bop
1962: Billy Taylor - Impromptu Music » Jazz » BeBop » Hard-bop
1962: Billy Taylor - Impromptu
Artist: Billy Taylor
Album: Impromptu
Label: Universal Distribution /Mercury
Year: 1962; release: 2002
Quality: MP3@320 kbps
Size: 98,4 mb
Total time: 43:30

Dr. Billy Taylor has done a lot for jazz as an educator, promoter, and performer, but far too many of his releases from the 1950s and 1960s, such as this date for Mercury, remain out of print. The talented pianist is joined by the very strong rhythm section of Jim Hall, Bob Cranshaw, and Walter Perkins on this 1962 release, which focuses exclusively on his original compositions. Several of these songs have remained in his repertoire and have been recorded again in the decades that followed, including "Capricious," "Paraphrase," and "At la Carousel." The high point, though, is the tense up-tempo "Don't Gon't Down South," written during the turbulent battle for civil rights, which features fine solos by both the leader and Hall. This 1962 LP will be fairly tough to acquire.
~ Ken Dryden, All Music Guide
1996:Dexter Gordon - Blue Dex: Dexter Gordon Palys the Blues Music, Jazz, Hard-bop
1996:Dexter Gordon - Blue Dex: Dexter Gordon Palys the Blues
Artist: Dexter Gordon
Album: Blue Dex: Dexter Gordon Plays the Blues
Label: Prestige
Year: 1996
Format: FLAC (cue, log, scans)
Time: 71:05
AMG Rating: 1996:Dexter Gordon - Blue Dex: Dexter Gordon Palys the Blues
REPOST with new links

This single-CD anthology is chock-full of the mighty Dexter Gordon (tenor sax) as leader or as primary participant in seven selections showcasing his surprisingly wide array of interpretive skills within the blues. While the majority of the contents have been culled from Gordon's late-'60s and early-'70s Prestige output, the update of Jay McShann's "The Jumpin' Blues," as well as Gordon's own "Sticky Wicket," are both alternate takes that weren't available prior to the all-inclusive 11-disc Complete Prestige Recordings (2004) box set. The latter opens the compilation as the double-sax assault of Gordon and James Moody (tenor sax) is supported by Barry Harris (piano), Buster Williams (bass), and Albert "Tootie" Heath (drums). The midtempo and minor chord changes have a menacing effect as the two tenors bounce ideas off one another. "The Panther" swings with a sinuous syncopated flow thanks to Larry Ridley (bass) and especially Alan Dawson (drums). Tommy Flanagan (piano) is also along for the ride and lays down a few classy lines of his own, which are punctuated by a brief solo from Williams. Gordon joins forces with Junior Mace (piano) at the 1970 Montreux Jazz Festival for a live cover of Thelonious Monk's "Blue Monk." Martin Rivera (bass) and Oliver Jackson (drums) are a solid, yet transparent rhythm section well-suited to frame Gordon's soulful and expressive sonic tug of war with Mance's refined ivories. The hot and driving "Lonesome Lover Blues" finds Gordon, Gene Ammons (tenor sax), Jodie Christian (piano), Rufus Reid (bass), and Wilbur Campbell (drums) blowing away the blues of guest vocalist Vi Redd -- daughter of drummer Alton Redd -- who was not only an alto saxophonist in her own right, but as evidenced by the contributions heard here, she was a dynamic soul shouter as well. The previously alluded to "alternate" of "The Jumpin' Blues" is from an upscale confab featuring Wynton Kelly (piano), Sam Jones (bass), and Roy Brooks. "Oh! Karen O" is definitely a keeper. Thad Jones (trumpet/flugelhorn) goes head to head with Gordon as Stanley Clarke (bass), Hank Jones (piano), and Louis Hayes (drums) give them plenty of space for their winding and expressive ventures. Clarke's interchanges are interesting as they weave and entwine harmonically with Gordon. Jimmy Heath's "Gingerbread Boy" returns listeners to the stage of the Montreux Jazz Festival. It is three years later and the personnel of Hampton Hawes (keyboards), Bob Cranshaw (bass), and Kenny Clarke (drums) provide a cool, laid-back groove as Gordon's sax underscores his keen and sensitive abilities as a wordless narrator who can create sonic portraits with the hues and shades of his empathetic tenor. For that reason alone Blue Dex: Dexter Gordon Plays the Blues is a worthy investment.
~ Lindsay Planer, AMG
1961: Dave Bailey - Bash! Music » Jazz » BeBop » Hard-bop

1961: Dave Bailey - Bash!
Artist: Dave Bailey
Album: Bash!
Label: Jazz Line
Year: 1961
Format, bitrate: Mp3, 320 Kbps
Time: 1:09:10
Size: 154 MB

Born in Portsmouth, Virginia, Bailey studied drumming in New York City at the Music Center Conservatory following his stint in the Air Force in World War II. He played with Herbie Jones from 195153, and later with Johnny Hodges, Charles Mingus, Lou Donaldson, Curtis Fuller, Billy Taylor, Art Farmer, Ben Webster, and Horace Silver. Between 1954 and 1968 he played on several sessions led by Gerry Mulligan, and in the 1960s he also played with Clark Terry, Kenny Dorham, Grant Green, Lee Konitz, Cal Tjader, Roger Kellaway, and Bob Brookmeyer. In 1969 he retired from music and became a flight instructor. From 1973 he worked in music education in New York; among other things, he was involved with The Jazzmobile. Bash!, Jazz Line. This one is quite rare, with Kenny Dorham on trumpet, Curtis Fuller on trombone, Tommy Flanagan on piano.
1969: Donald Byrd - Kofi Music » Jazz » BeBop » Hard-bop
1969: Donald Byrd - Kofi
Artist: Donald Byrd
Album: Kofi
Label: Blue Note (Rare Groove Series)
Total time: 43:38
Format/Bitrate: FLAC
Size: 273 MB (scans)
REPOST with new links

Kofi was extracted from some of last Blue Note sessions of the 1960s before Byrd's ventures into soul fusion territory. The playing here is no less than stellar, with seasoned veterans such as Ron Carter and Airto Moreira giving Byrd more than ample support to stretch out and soulfully foreshadow elements of future recordings. Lew Tabackin easily shares the spotlight with his beautiful flute passages on the title track, while Frank Foster and the rest of the supporting group complement Byrd's playing with a grace that emulates the early chemistry between the early Miles Davis groups of the early '60s. The subtle relaxed tones of this album make it truly one of the essential releases in Byrd's catalog, not only from a historical standpoint (his future collaborations with the Mizell brothers would take him to an entirely different plane of thought), but from a casual listening standpoint as well. ~ Rob Theakston, All Music Guide
1969: Freddie Hubbard - The Black Angel Music » Jazz » BeBop » Hard-bop
1969: Freddie Hubbard - The Black Angel
Artist: Freddie Hubbard
Album: The Black Angel
Label: Atlantic
Year: 1969
Release 1999
Format: Flac
Time: 45:35
Size: 307.33 MB

Repost with new links

Freddie Hubbard released The Black Angel in the same year as the landmark Miles Davis album Bitches Brew. Its obvious Hubbard wanted to appeal to the emerging crossover rock/jazz crowd of the era. The presence of bop, however, still permeated Hubbard's playing, unlike Miles who had long since dropped the form. The opening Hubbard composition "Spacetrack" contains fiery avant garde interplay between Hubbard, James Spaulding on alto and Kenny Barron's electric piano. Thanks to Spaulding and bassist Reggie Workman, much of the playing here maintains intensity. The other Hubbard penned originals, "Gittin Down" is an urgent hard swinging boogaloo and the ballad "Eclipse" features Spaulding on flute and Barron on piano. "Coral Keys" written by Walter Bishop, Jr. and Barron's "Black Angel have a Latin tinge highlighted by Spaulding's soaring flute and the congas of Carlos "Patato" Valdes. An enjoyable session leaving the impression Hubbard was preparing to take a different musical direction.
~ Al Campbell, All Music Guide
1956: Frank Wess Septet - Frank Wess Septet Feat. Frank Foster: North, South, East... Wess + No 'Count Music » Jazz » BeBop » Hard-bop
1956: Frank Wess Septet - Frank Wess Septet Feat. Frank Foster: North, South, East... Wess + No 'Count
Artist: Frank Wess Septet
Album: Frank Wess Septet Feat. Frank Foster: North, South, East... Wess + No 'Count
Label: Fresh Sound FSRCD 704
Year: 1965; Release: 2012
Format, bitrate: Mp3, 320 kBit/s
Time: 1:13:17
Size: 189 MB (w.s.)

Theres no Count Basie here, but his spirit pervades these relaxed, swinging sessions, not least because five Basie alumni – Frank Foster, Frank Wess, Benny Powell, Henry Coker and Eddie Jones – splendidly lead the way. Aided by guitarist Kenny Burrell and drummer Kenny Clarke, with arrangements that offer plenty of space for soloists, this is a typically accomplished, unpretentious Basie-type small group blowing session. The piano-less rhythm section is buttressed by the solid bass of Eddie Jones and a cooking Kenny Clarke, while Kenny Burrell proves a fine comper and a down-home blues player. ~ Fresh Sound Records
1981: Max Roach - Chattahoochee Red Hard-bop, Post-bop
1981: Max Roach - Chattahoochee Red
Artist: Max Roach
Album: Chattahoochee Red
Label: Columbia FC 37376
Year: 1981
Format, bitrate: Mp3, 320 kBit/s
Time: 41:09
Size: 98 MB (i.c.)
AMG rating: 1981: Max Roach - Chattahoochee Red

For this quartet outing, Max Roach performs seven group originals plus tributes to Clifford Brown ("I Remember Clifford"), Thelonious Monk ("'Round Midnight") and John Coltrane ("Giant Steps"). Roach's regular band (with trumpeter Cecil Bridgewater, Odean Pope on tenor, flute and oboe, bassist Calvin Hill and on "Wefe," guest pianist Walter Bishop, Jr.) is in excellent form on this spirited outing; pity that this LP has been out of print for quite some time.
~ Scott Yanow, All Music Guide
1960: The Nashville All-Stars - After The Riot At Newport 1960 Hard-bop, Post-bop
1960: The Nashville All-Stars  - After The Riot At Newport 1960
Artists: The Nashville All-Stars
Album: After The Riot At Newport 1960
Label: Bear Family/RCA Victor
Year: 1960; release: 1999
Quality: MP3@320 kbps
Size: 102 mb
Total time: 42:36
AMG Rating: 1960: The Nashville All-Stars  - After The Riot At Newport 1960

The year 1960 was not a transitional time for jazz. Be-bop and its successor hard-bop were still the order of the stylistic day and the free approach of Ornette Coleman had yet to take hold. The Newport Rhode Island Festival was an annual gathering of the jazz clan. And it was in July 1960 that a group of Nashvilles finest players made the journey to Newport for a much-anticipated performance.

Chet Atkins, Boots Randolph, Hank Garland were the best of Nashville session musicians, playing on many country and pop recordings day in and day out. They were all jazz music fans and very proficient jazz players too, jamming at every opportunity in local Nashville clubs. They would often be joined by 17 year old vibes prodigy, Gary Burton.
So this all-star band headed to Newport, Rhode Island for what Im sure would have been a tremendous show. Unfortunately, festival organizers had trouble managing an unruly crowd and most of the schedule was scrapped, including the appearance of the Nashville All-stars.

But the guys were determined to document their music anyway and recorded what is today a milestone album yet widely overlooked jazz classic After the Riot at Newport. Germanys Bear Family label reissued the long out of print LP a few years back and Nashville Public Library was fortunate enough to obtain a copy for the jazz collection. Especially noteworthy is the fabulous playing of Gary Burton and Hank Garland. To me these two have never played better. In fact, the whole project stands as proof that there is so much more to the Nashville music scene than meets the eye. It is highly recommended.
~ nashvillepubliclibrary.org
1964: J.J. Johnson - Live In London Music » Jazz » BeBop » Hard-bop

1964: J.J. Johnson - Live In London
Artist: J.J. Johnson
Album: Live In London
Label: Harkit HRKCD 8060
Year: 1964; Release: 2003
Format, bitrate: mp3@320kbps
Time: 1:15:19
Size: 174 MB (i.s.)

The firm grip that American tenor saxophonists have held on the bandstand at Ronnie Scotts Club was loosened recently by the appearance of J. J. Johnson for three weeks. He arrived preceded by the reputation of being the greatest name in modern jazz-trombone playing and his work at Ronnies did much to bear this out. To anyone unfamiliar with J. J.s in-the-flesh playing, the most impressive facet would probably be his tone. On record his technique, facility and ideas are self-evident, but often the tone sounds too bland, too dull. In person nothing, but nothing, could be further from the truth. Its a beautiful sound, very compactand yet bright. On the ballads particularly, the sound was huge, always with no vibrato. His fluency is quite extraordinary. Even at very fast tempos (the slide-trombonists nightmare), he executes the most difficult phrases with tremendous precision and attack.
Another impressive aspect of his playing is his endurance. To play three sets a night, solo, Is tough for any brass playerand yet J.J. played long, extended solos, frequently blowing around top D and E flat and creating tremendous heat and excitement. Also he played long, lip-taxing balladsThe Nearness Of You and Goodbye were particularly impressive. He played mainly Standards and Bluesa tried-and-trusted formulaand used his own Turnpike as a play-off at the end of each set.
~ Keith Christie
1978: Tommy Flanagan and Hank Jones - Our Delights Hard-bop, Post-bop
1978: Tommy Flanagan and Hank Jones - Our Delights
Artists - Tommy Flanagan & Hank Jones
Album - Our Delights
Label - OJC/Fantasy
Year - 1978, release - 1996
Quality - MP3@320 kbps
Size - 83:54
Total time - 48:57
REPOST by request



Piano duets have the potential danger of getting overcrowded and a bit incoherent, but neither happens on this rather delightful set. Hank Jones and Tommy Flanagan, two of the four great jazz pianists (along with Barry Harris and Roland Hanna) to emerge from Detroit in the '40s and '50s, have similar styles and their mutual respect is obvious. Their renditions of seven superior bop standards (including "Jordu," "Confirmation" and Thad Jones' "A Child Is Born") plus an alternate take of "Robbins Nest" on this CD reissue are tasteful, consistently swinging and inventive within the tradition. ~ Scott Yanow, All Music Guide
1958: Dizzy Reece - Nowhere To Go Music » Jazz » BeBop » Hard-bop
1958: Dizzy Reece - Nowhere To Go
Artist: Dizzy Reece
Album: Nowhere To Go
Label: Tempo EXA 86
Year: 1958
Format, bitrate: Mp3, 320 kBit/s
Time: 11:10
Size: 22 MB (i.c.)

Only limited use has been made of jazz as incidental music for British films, but Dizzy Reeceís ambitious scores for the recent Balcon production "Nowhere To Go" are a step in the right direction and compare favourably with some of the colourful themes played by the West Coasters for Hollywood movies. Moody and expressive, these tracks rank among Dizzy's most noteworthy compositions, and are outstanding examples of descriptive writing.
Both Dizzy and his front-line partner Tubby Hayes blow short, virile solos on "Main Title" and skate nimbly around the chords of the fast blues, "Escape And Chase". This title opens with some insistent cowbell work by Phil Seamen, while the up-tempo sequences are highlighted by Lloyd Thompson's powerful bass-work. "The Search" (sub-titled ''On The Scene") is a down-to-earth blues with crisp, crackling trumpet, a generous helping of robust tenor, and excellent "walking" bass. "Sunset Scene" is a reiteration of "Main Title"óa mournful melody that you'll find spinning round in your Read long after the record has finished.
~ Keith Goodwin, Jazz Journal Vol. 12, No. 4, April 1959
1964: Wayne Shorter - Night Dreamer Music » Jazz » BeBop » Hard-bop
1964: Wayne Shorter - Night Dreamer
Artist: Wayne Shorter
Album: Night Dreamer [RVG Edition]
Year: 1964; release: 2005
Label: Blue Note/EMI
Format: lossless files (flac, cue, log)
Size: 305 mb (with scans)
AMG Rating: 1964: Wayne Shorter - Night Dreamer

REPOST with new links from Mr. hungaropitecus

Tenor saxophonist Wayne Shorter's Blue Note debut found him well prepared to enter the big time. With an impressive quintet that included trumpeter Lee Morgan, pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Reggie Workman, and drummer Elvin Jones, Shorter performed a well-rounded program consisting of five of his originals (this CD reissue adds an alternate take of "Virgo") plus an adaptation of an "Oriental Folk Song." Whether it be the brooding title cut, the Coltrane-ish ballad "Virgo," or the long modal jams on "Black Nile" and "Charcoal Blues," this is a memorable set of high-quality and timeless music. In 2005 Night Dreamer became a title in the Rudy Van Gelder series of reissues. Van Gelder completely remastered the set from its original studio tapes and the sonic quality is remarkably different from earlier CD editions. There is no other added material.
~ Scott Yanow & Thom Jurek, All Music Guide
1967: Dexter Gordon - There Will Never Be Another You Hard-bop, Post-bop
1967: Dexter Gordon - There Will Never Be Another You
Artist: Dexter Gordon
Album: There Will Never Be Another You (Live at the Montmarte, Copenhagen)
Label: Jazz Time
Year: 1967; release: 1996
Quality: eac-flac (cue, log)
Size: 342 MB (with artwork)
Total time: 54:02
REPOST with new links


This old thing is my first Dexter Gordon album, but I have been playing it constantly for a week. His version of "But Not For Me" is as good, or better, than John Coltrane's on his "My Favorite Things" CD. The other three standards are all interesting as well. So is the Sonny Rollins composition "Doxy." These tracks were laid down in Denmark in 1967. Playing with Dexter are Kenny Drew on piano, Nils Pederson on bass, and Al Heath on the drums. If you like swinging jazz sax in the '50's style, you'll enjoy this one.
~ William E. Adams, Amazon.com
1961: Charlie Byrd - Blues Sonata Music » Jazz » BeBop » Hard-bop
1961: Charlie Byrd - Blues SonataArtist: Charlie Byrd
Album: Blues Sonata
Format: FLAC
Label: OJC/Riverside
Year: 1961; release: 2001
Size:231 mb (full artwork)
Total time: 40:46

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Though recorded on one day, at standard length for an LP, this is really two albums in one sleeve, showcasing two rather different formats for this highly original guitarist to pursue. "The Blues Sonata" is set up in a pseudo-classical three-movement manner, with a polonaise, ballad, and scherzo, and the liner notes refer to a sonata form of development. Well, sorry, but the classical trappings, if any exist, are worn very lightly by Byrd, his bassist Keter Betts, and drummer Buddy Deppenschmidt. "Polonaise Pour Pietro" t'ain't nothin' the blues, and a very fluid blues workout at that. "Ballade in B Minor" is Chopinesque in melodic influence only, including the brush-stroked improvisation segment, and "Scherzo for an Old Shoe" sets up as a Latinish number, then stays on one chord with an Andalusian strain. On side two, the scene abruptly becomes very urbane as Byrd switches to electric guitar, takes on Barry Harris' comping, bopping piano, and engages in straightforward swinging and balladeering without any textbook definitions getting in the way. "Alexander's Ragtime Band," "Jordu," and "Zing! Went the Strings on My Heart" are the merry swingers, "That Ole Devil Called Love" the relaxed ballad showcase. Whatever you call the music, the whole CD goes down easily and musically. ~ Richard S. Ginell, All Music Guide
1962: Ted Curson Quintet - Live At La Tête De L'Art Hard-bop, Post-bop
1962: Ted Curson Quintet - Live At La Tête De L'Art
Artist: Ted Curson Quintet
Album: Live at La Tete de L'Art: The Canadian Concert of Ted Curson
Label: Trans World (TWJ 7000)
Year: 1962
Format, bitrate: Flac (LP-Rip)
Time: 43:20
Size: 270MB
AMG rating: 1962: Ted Curson Quintet - Live At La Tête De L'Art

***** Re-Rip - New Link *****


This was to be Curson's second date as a leader, the first being 'Plenty Of Horn' on the Old Town label recorded in NYC in 1961. As a younger musician he is in fine form. Lots of 'Fire Down Below' in this live concert. His supporting crew are also inspirational, although unknown to me. In particular the altoist soars well with Ted's horn. Also of significance and harmony is the pianist. Overall an impressive blowing session of his own tunes. Many of these would become a stable part of his repertoire. Sadly Ted is no longer with us, but this is one great place to start; to appreciate his mighty contribution to the jazz world.

Other than an obscure release for the tiny Old Town label, this radio broadcast (released on an LP but not yet on CD) was trumpeter Ted Cursons recording debut as a leader. Teamed up with local players (altoist Al Doctor, pianist Maury Kaye, bassist Charles Biddles and drummer Charles Duncan) for the advanced hard bop date, Curson sounds in fine form on five of his originals; best-known is Quicksand.
~ Scott Yanow, All Music Guide.
1966: Yusef Lateef - The Golden Flute Music » Jazz » BeBop » Hard-bop
1966: Yusef Lateef - The Golden Flute
Artist: Yusef Lateef
Album: The Golden Flute
Label: Impulse! A 9125
Year: 1966; Release: 2004
Format, bitrate: Mp3, 320 kBit/s
Time: 39:34
Size: 96 MB
AMG Rating: 1966: Yusef Lateef - The Golden Flute


The emphasis is on older tunes and styles on this Yusef Lateef Impulse! album. Lateef (switching between tenor, flute, and oboe) plays such numbers as "Straighten Up and Fly Right," "Ghost of a Chance," "Exactly like You" (on oboe), and "Rosetta" along with some group originals. Lateef has long been a true original, and he revitalizes the standards while always swinging and being a bit unpredictable. Well worth searching for, this was Lateef's final Impulse! album before switching to Atlantic.
~ Scott Yanow, All Music Guide
1965: Carmell Jones - Jay Hawk Talk Music » Jazz » BeBop » Hard-bop
1965: Carmell Jones - Jay Hawk Talk
Artist: Carmell Jones
Album: Jay Hawk Talk
Label: Prestige Records
Year: 1965 ; release: 2000
Format, bitrate: Mp3, 320 kBit/s
Time: 38:22
Size: 87.8Mb
AMG rating: 1965: Carmell Jones - Jay Hawk Talk

Repost with a new link from Luloboo

Hard bopper Carmell Jones is in fine form on this 1965 outing, Jay Hawk Talk. Together with tenor Jimmy Heath, pianist Barry Harris, bassist George Tucker, and drummer Roger Humphries, Jones confidently tackles a half-dozen tunes. From the piano/bass riff at the beginning of "Jay Hawk Talk" to the Parker-esque kickoff of "Beepdurple," the band holds a steady, driving groove. Both of those instrumentals, plus "Dance of the Night Child," were written by Jones and stand comfortably beside the other selections on this album. Tucker kicks off a particularly affecting version of "Willow Weep for Me," with a simple descending bass run. Jones enters with a full and rich tone for a beautiful, extended solo, and is followed by Harris, who emphasizes the bluesy, late-night feel of the piece. The band turns in a nine-minute version of Porter's "What Is This Thing Called Love?" that pulls out all the stops, and gives Heath plenty of room to show that he can fly as high and play as fast as Charlie Parker himself. Throughout the album, Tucker's bass work adds greatly to the overall texture; Tucker and Humphries together provide a steady pulse with lots of charged rhythm to keep the whole project stimulating. Jay Hawk Talk will remind everyone of Jones' distinctive voice. Like Johnny Griffin, Jones moved to Europe in the '60s, greatly lowering his profile in the United States. This re-release of an old classic should help to familiarize everyone once again with a great trumpeter.
~ Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr., All Music Guide
1977: Howard McGhee - Jazzbrothers Hard-bop, Post-bop

1977: Howard McGhee - Jazzbrothers
Artist: Howard McGhee
Album: Jazzbrothers
Label: Storyville
Year: 1977
Format, bitrate: Mp3, 320 Kbps
Time: 54:23
Size: 123.97 MB

Post-bop lived quite well in the '70s, especially when expressed by Howard McGhee and Charlie Rouse, as formidable a trumpet/tenor sax tandem as has ever existed. Add peerless pianist Barry Harris, bassist Lisle Atkinson, and drummer Grady Tate, and you had a dynamic quintet that could not only swing hard and play deep, but could even throw Latin rhythms into the mix, with the help of unsung conga player Jual Curtis. The ten songs on Jazz Brothers, a companion recording to Rouse's 1977 album Moment's Notice, make all this abundantly clear. "One for George" and "Driftin'" are essentially the same tune: a patient, counterpointed horn line in a slow-blues framework. "Island Mood," which uses a churning Latin rhythm and turnaround melody reminiscent of "Caravan," features Rouse's spare, staccato tenor contrasts and McGhee's Dizzy Gillespie-like muted trumpet, while the hot calypso bop "Frisky" is replete with melody and rhythm changes that recall "What Is This Thing Called Love?" Straight bop and calypso are welded together on "In There," the out-and-out bopper "Queens" (featuring drum stops from Tate), and the simple tag-team melody of "Search." Rouse gets a ballad feature on "When Sonny Gets Blue," displaying all of the original, wistful passion that made him Monk's favorite. This is an imperfect session, but not so much musically. The hour-long running time is disappointingly deceptive, because alternate takes of each song chew up much of that space. There are also some speed distortions during the piano solos, as if the master tapes were either defective or damaged. Nonetheless, this is some great modern jazz from a group of gentlemen who knew their stuff stone cold.
~ Michael G. Nastos, All Music Guide
1970: John Patton - Memphis to New York Spirit Hard-bop, Soul-Jazz
1970: John Patton - Memphis to New York Spirit
Artist: John Patton
Album: Memphis to New York Spirit
Label: Blue Note (1996)
Year: 1970
Format: FLAC
Time: 57:47
Size: 363 MB (full scans)

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Although it was scheduled for release two times, Memphis to New York Spirit didn't appear until 1996, over 25 years after it was recorded. The album comprises the contents of two separate sessions one recorded in 1970 with guitarist James "Blood" Ulmer, drummer Leroy Williams and saxophonist/flautist Marvin Cabell; the other recorded in 1969 with Cabell, Williams, and saxophonist George Coleman that were very similiar in concept and execution. Patton leads his combo through a selection of originals and covers that range from Wayne Shorter and McCoy Tyner to the Meters. Though the group is rooted in soul-jazz, they stretch the limits of the genre on these sessions, showing a willingness to experiment, while still dipping into the more traditional blues and funk reserves. Consequently, Memphis to New York Spirit doesn't have a consistent groove like some other Patton records, but when it does click, the results are remarkable; it's a non-essential but worthy addition to a funky soul-jazz collection.
~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide
1963-1970: John Patton - The Organization! Jazz, Hard-bop, Soul-Jazz
1963-1970: John Patton - The Organization!
Artist: John Patton
Album: The Best of "Big" John Patton: The Organization!
Label: Blue Note
Year: 1963-1970
Release: 1994
Format: FLAC
Time: 78:03
Size: 518 MB (with scans)
AMG Rating: 1963-1970: John Patton - The Organization!

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Super 78-minute anthology of Patton's prime (1963-70) era, unfortunately released only in the U.K., drawn from nine albums. 1963's "Along Came John," and 1966's "Amanda," and the two cuts from his best album, 1965's Let 'Em Roll ( "The Turnaround" and "Latona" ) are particular cookers, but the organ-guitar-horn groove is always solid, and the riffs basic but compelling. This is some of the best soul-jazz ever, usually featuring Grant Green on guitar, though a young James Ulmer takes over on axe for the 1970-era cuts.
~ Richie Unterberger, All Music Guide
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