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Jazz Blues Club » Articles for 03.10.2011
1996: Kevin Eubanks - Live At Bradley's Music » Jazz » BeBop » Post-bop
1996: Kevin Eubanks - Live At Bradley's
Artist: Kevin Eubanks
Album: Live At Bradley's
Label: Blue Note
Year: 1994 ; release: 1996
Format, bitrate: mp3, 320kbps
Time: 73min
Size: 163 mb


On this live date, Kevin Eubanks is joined by pianist James Williams and bassist Robert Hurst for a mainly straight-ahead affair. Most of Eubanks' best-known solo work lies in a more fusiony vein, such as Turning Point or Spiritalk, but on Live at Bradley's his playing is refreshingly conventional. Both his single-note lines and his chordal embellishments show a surprisingly deep knowledge of the history of jazz guitar. There are moments when Eubanks' playing even evokes George Van Eps. Five out of the seven tracks on this record are over ten minutes long, and all of them drag somewhere in the middle, as the improvisations of the musicians tend to be a little bit formless. However, there are some nice moments here, as on the opening track, where Williams elegantly swings through the changes of "Speak Low" while Eubanks and Hurst make the presence of a drummer superfluous with their deep groove and percussive accents. In this sort of drummerless trio arrangement, Hurst takes the place of the ride cymbal and Eubanks provides the punctuation. The groove is so convincing that at those moments where Hurst's bass buzzes, it almost sounds like the ring of a cymbal. The weakness of Live at Bradley's is that, given the rather conventional nature of these compositions, the players don't address them in a terribly interesting way. These songs are competently and musically played, but it's nothing that the average jazz fan hasn't heard before. Eubanks fans who are curious to hear him in this sort of format will certainly be entertained.
~ Daniel Gioffre, All Music Guide
2006 - Dennis González - Boston Project - No Photograph Available Music » Jazz » Modern Jazz » Avantgarde
2006 - Dennis González - Boston Project - No Photograph Available
Artist: Dennis González
Album: Boston Project - No Photograph Available
Label: Clean Feed
Year: 2006
Quality: Flac
Size: 342 mb
Total time: 63:52



"Dennis' first recording without his sons since 1999...he had the good fortune to come to Boston and work with this group, and had not played with any members of the great Boston-based group before this, but that would be hard to tell from the great outcome of this fine disc. Coltrane used two bassists on "Africa Brass", both playing different parts and I can hear echoes of a similar vibe here. "
~ Bruce Lee Gallanter review at DMG


1961: Oliver Nelson Orchestra - Afro American Sketches Progressive Jazz, Modern Big Band

1961: Oliver Nelson Orchestra - Afro American Sketches
Artist: Oliver Nelson
Album: Afro American Sketches
Label: OJC/Prestige (Limited edition)
Year: 1961 ; release: 1993
Format, bitrate: mp3, 320kbps
Time: 41:02
Size: 91 mb
AMG rating 1961: Oliver Nelson Orchestra - Afro American Sketches

This CD reissue brings back Oliver Nelson's first big-band date as a leader. Meant as a folk album paying tribute to the history of blacks in America, there are such songs as "Jungleaire," "Emancipation Blues," "Going Up North" and "Freedom Dance." Among the soloists are flutist Jerry Dodgion, trumpeter Joe Newman and Nelson himself on tenor and alto. Even this early, Nelson's writing had its own sound; his seven-part suite is well worth hearing.
~ Scott Yanow, All Music Guide
1994: Rebirth Brass Band - Rollin' Music » Jazz » Traditional Jazz » New Orleans Jazz
1994: Rebirth Brass Band - Rollin'
Artist: Rebirth Brass Band
Album: Rollin'
Label: Rounder
Year: 1994
Style: New Orleans Jazz, Jazz-Funk,
Format, bitrate: mp3 @ 192 kb/s
Size: 72.4mb (with cover)
AMG rating 1994: Rebirth Brass Band - Rollin'

Rollin' finds the Rebirth Brass Band retaining their ancestral brass band roots while injecting funky youthful exuberance into a set encompassing traditional marches, reggae, bebop, and funk. Rollin' explodes with captivating solos and engaging ensemble playing throughout, maintaining the most important factor in this kind of music: keeping the second-line party nonstop. With Rollin', Rebirth continued to unshackle the restrictions that surrounded the more traditional aspects of the brass band genre. The majority of original material was split between tuba player/band leader Philip Frazier and tenor saxophonist Roderick Paulin, while the Joe Zawinul-penned jazz classic "Mercy, Mercy, Mercy" is covered, along with the traditional "Just a Little While to Stay Here."
~ Al Campbell, All Music Guide
2010: Junior Wells & The Aces - Live in Boston 1966 Music » Blues » Modern electric blues » Modern Electric Chicago Blues
2010: Junior Wells & The Aces - Live in Boston 1966Artist: Junior Wells & The Aces
Album: Live in Boston 1966
Label: Delmark Records
Year: 1966
Release: 2010
Format, bitrate: mp3, 320kb/s
Time: 65 min.
Size: 137 MB
AMG rating: 2010: Junior Wells & The Aces - Live in Boston 1966

Feisty, full of street swagger, humor, and sweat, Live in Boston 1966 provides a side of Junior Wells' stage persona that few, if any, of his other albums revealed. This previously unreleased date features Wells with the Aces; the crack bar band that he began his solo recording career with in the early '50s for the States imprint. The Aces -- guitarist Louis Myers, bassist Dave Myers, and drummer Fred Below -- were playing juke joints and bars on the South and West sides of Chicago, their early, deserved reputation as one of Chicago's hardest swinging blues bands had, by the '60s, been all but eclipsed by Buddy Guy and Magic Sam. This gig is as enjoyable a listening experience as it is an historical artifact, following as it does the previous year's classic Hoodoo Man Blues. Wells and the Aces are playing from the heart: they reach back to the gritty electric blues of the old-school Chicago ensemble sound -- the postwar years -- and they flaunt their panache with the funkier R&B grooves that the West Side blazed trails with in the early '6os, and they look to the future with the nastier, more improvisational electric blues that would come later in the decade. How many blues recordings can you hear where the artist's stage banter is as fresh on the tenth listen as it was on the first? Even more importantly, one on which the banter is as enjoyable as the music itself? Wells raps plenty here. The album begins with the opener "Feelin' Good," and extends from between-song banter where he engages the audience, to his improvised originals such as the killer "Junior's Whoop," "I Don't Know," and "If You Gonna Leave Me." The way he and the Aces work together is seamless and instinctual; Wells can take chances with his lyrics and his harp phrasing because the band is on a roll; they are part and parcel of the groove; they push Wells further in a friendly, competitive way. The band just shines. The standards here are completely reinvented. Dig the readings of standards such as "Man Downstairs," "That's All Right," "Look on Yonder's Wall," and "Mojo Workin'," they're uptempo, full of raucous exuberance and soul, while the reading of Sleepy John Estes "Worried Life Blues" is lowdown sad as the crying blues get. The sound on here is gritty, but very present. Live in Boston 1966 is the great blues surprise of 2010.
~ Thom Jurek, All Music Guide
1958: Hampton Hawes - For Real! Music » Jazz » BeBop » Hard-bop


1958: Hampton Hawes - For Real!
Artist: Hampton Hawes
Album: For Real!
Year: 1958, release: 1995
Label: Contemporary/OJC
Quality: mp3/320 kbps
Size: 120 MB
Time: 46:11
AMG rating 1958: Hampton Hawes - For Real!


Although For Real! was at least Hampton Hawes' 11th record as a leader, it was his first (and one of his relatively few) that included a horn player. The pianist matches quite well with the hard bop tenor of Harold Land (heard in his early prime), and the quartet outing, which also includes drummer Frank Butler, has an extra bonus in the playing of the brilliant bassist Scott LaFaro. Performing three bop standards (including "Crazeology") and three originals (two of which were co-written by Land), pianist Hawes sounds inspired by the other players and is in top form throughout the generally memorable outing.
~ Scott Yanow, All Music Guide.
1963: Paul Gonsalves Cleopatra Feelin Jazzy Music » Jazz » Mainstream
1963: Paul Gonsalves  Cleopatra Feelin Jazzy
Artist: Paul Gonsalves
Album: Cleopatra Feelin Jazzy
Label: MCA/Impulse!
Year: 1963; release: 1998
Quality: MP3@320 kbps
Size: 91,2 mb
Total time: 41:05
For ninikoo!

Taking off from director Joseph Mankiewicz' messy celluloid interpretation of Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra (DeMille took the first and best stab at it in 1934), tenor saxophonist Paul Gonsalves casts the Egyptian queen's life in a jazz set of originals and Alex North movie themes. One of just two dates Gonsalves did for Impulse and part of an all-too-thin solo catalog, Cleopatra -- Feelin' Jazzy finds the famed Ellington soloist in the prime company of hard boppers like pianist Hank Jones, organist Dick Hyman, guitarist Kenny Burrell, bassist George Duvivier, and drummer Roy Haynes. The band shines throughout, with Hyman's organ adding exotic film theater ambience on the two North cuts that kick off the album. Switching over to more straightforward fare, Gonsalves and company stretch out on Burrell's "Bluz for Liz" (read Elizabeth Taylor, one of the leads in the movie) and Ellington's "Action in Alexandria." The album's conceptual framework is maintained on standouts like "Cleo's Asp," Burrell's second piece here, and the Manny Albam blues ballad "Cleopatra's Lament." Gonsalves impresses with both complexly swinging solos and breathy ballad statements. A very fine effort by one of the unsung giants of jazz. ~ Stephen Cook, All Music Guide
2001: The Josh Roseman Unit - Cherry Music » Jazz » Modern Jazz
2001: The Josh Roseman Unit - Cherry Artist: The Josh Roseman Unit
Album: Cherry
Label: Knitting Factory Works
Year: 1998; release: 2001
Format, bitrate: mp3, 256
Size: 103 mb

When did you last revel in the glory of a trombone-led jazz band that plays rock & roll? Here's one that'll bring a smile to your face. Josh Roseman has the quirky charisma necessary to turn the often sedate trombone into a leading instrument, and his band's first album showcases his skill and his rather bent sense of humor. Full of covers (and a few originals), Cherry is a cheery journey through funk, soul, jazz, and rock. The band's off-tempo take on Led Zeppelin's "Kashmir" is worth a listen, as is their Morphine-like rendition of Nirvana's "Smell's Like Teen Spirit." But these tunes feel like tossed-off jokes meant to attract attention and they get tiresome quickly. The unit's version of Burt Bacharach's "Land of Make Believe," on the other hand, is poignant and sticky sweet in all the good ways. Roseman also throws in some Sun Ra, Marvin Gaye, the Beatles, and other tunes to cover all his influences. And while it's certainly fun to hear his vision of each of those, Roseman doesn't give himself enough credit for his own compositional skill. His three original works shine more than the covers. His slow, soulful melody on "Extra Virgin" is the most beautiful song on the album. In his own work, you hear elements of the artists he covers -- Sun Ra's experimentation, Bacharach's hooks, and Gaye's soul -- but in a unique way. He especially favors his Sun Ra side on the march-like "Trousertrout," which takes a couple of minutes to get to the hook, but it's fun when it arrives.
~ Mike Gowan, All Music Guide

If you ever wondered whether a musician could transform Elvis Presley's "Don't Be Cruel," into a quasi, calypso-funk groove than stop right here. Well, notions such as these may seem fiendishly theoretical in scope, yet New York City-based trombonist, Josh Roseman's debut solo effort is full of dainty little surprises. Not only he does he pay a little homage to King Elvis, but also tackles Burt Bachrach, Led Zeppelin and the late alternative rock icon, Kurt Cobain among others. With support from a venerable crew of fellow modern jazz acolytes, Roseman and his willing accomplices, render a feisty big band arrangement of Lennon/McCartney's "If I Fell." Whereas, the ensemble fabricates Zeppelin's "Kashmir," into a huge wall of sound, featuring the leader's gritty horn work. By the way, this Zeppelin hard rock classic seems to be a favorite amid jazz and fusion artists, evidenced by "The Dregs," and more recently, on J.A.Granelli's EZ Pour Spout project. However, Roseman also shines as an astute and rather clever songsmith on such originals as the memorably tuneful "Extra Virgin."
The musicians' tongue-in-cheek rendition of Sun Ra's "Love In Outer Space," might kindle thoughts of a rowdy Italian wedding although guitarist, Ben Monder provides the jazz element via his fleet fingered single note runs. Guitar whiz, David Fiuczynski renders the loud, chunka-chunka chord progressions during the "Nirvana" hit, Smells Like Teen Spirit." Furthermore, Roseman dedicates this production to both Sun Ra and the recently departed trumpeter, Lester Bowie - who performed on three of these works.
Roseman's wondrous and cleverly articulated brainchild is chock full of robust soloing and cagey arrangements. Besides all of his ingenuity and wit - Roseman has resourcefully touched upon the periphery of the road less traveled, due to his sophisticated approach to the material. Cheerfully recommended!

~ Glenn Astarita, All About Jazz
1964: Wynton Kelly - It's All Right Music » Jazz » BeBop » Hard-bop
1964: Wynton Kelly - It's All RightArtist: Wynton Kelly
Album: It's All Right
Label:Verve
Recording Date:1964
Quality: mp3@320 kbps
Size: 87 mb

REPOST with a new link from lex


The Wynton Kelly Trio (consisting of the pianist, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Jimmy Cobb) are augmented by guitarist Kenny Burrell and percussionist Candido on the 1997 CD reissue of It's All Right. The music is essentially easy listening jazz with concise versions of ten numbers, including a rendition of Charles Lloyd's "One for Joan" that was only previously released in Europe. In addition to the one "new" selection, a few unnecessary false starts for "Kelly Roll" have been included. A brief "The Fall of Love" finds the group joined by a steel drum band, although it makes little impression. The best songs here are "Portrait of Jeannie" and "On the Trail," but overall, this effort is not too essential. [This Japanese release includes bonus material.] ~ Scott Yanow, All Music Guide
2007: Antti Sarpila Swing Band - 25th Anniversary Music » Jazz » Swing
2007: Antti Sarpila Swing Band - 25th Anniversary
Artist: Antti Sarpila Swing Band
Album: 25th Anniversary
Label: Antti Sarpila
Year: 2007
Format, bitrate: mp3 @ 192 kb/s
Time: 72:50 min
Size: 97mb (with cover)


Antti Sarpila is one of the few internationally known jazz musicians from Finland. Although based in Helsinki, he performs extensively as a solo artist all over the world.

In Finland Antti Sarpila has his own group - the Antti Sarpila Swing Band, which celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2007. In the fall of 2006 Antti Sarpila Swing Band brought "Swinging Christmas" to every corner of Finland. Finnish jazz federation has awarded Antti Sarpila with the annual "George" award 1997 and Classic Jazz Society with the "Louis Armstrong" award 1996.
~ jazzdagen.com
2011: Tribute to Miles Davis - Jazz à Juan Antibes (Juan-les-Pins International Jazz Festival) Post-bop, Modern Jazz
2011: Tribute to Miles Davis - Jazz à Juan  Antibes (Juan-les-Pins International Jazz Festival)
Artist: Tribute to Miles Davis
Album: Jazz à Juan Antibes [b](Juan-les-Pins International Jazz Festival)[/b]
Label: Bootleg (Radio Broadcast)
Year: 2011
Format, bitrate: Mp3, VBR
Time: CD 1-65.16/CD 2-46.45
Size: 184MB

The reinterpretations of Miles tunes here are the most interesting I've heard since the Yo Miles project. And astoundingly, covers just about every era of Miles Davis music. Truly amazing music.

"After a few weeks in the United States, we set off for the festival in Antibes in the South of France. We knocked them dead!" In 1963, Miles Davis couldn't get over it: "In Antibes, there was a huge poster of me near my hotel. I thought: 'What a world! I don't get that in New York, but here, thousands of people travel specially to listen to me in a spirit of brotherhood'."
This year promises another family gathering in a sumptuous tribute to one of the greatest trumpet players in the history of jazz, sadly deceased some twenty years ago. All of the artists who will play on the legendary stage in the pine forest will have a thought for Miles Davis - from Jamie Cullum ("I discovered the festival thanks to recordings of Keith Jarrett and Miles Davis") to Marcus Miller ("He taught me to be myself"), not forgetting those with whom he shared his Jazz à Juan adventures: Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter. Then there are those who, at one time or another in their careers, crossed the sunny path of this mutant form of the blue note. They will all come together at the annual celebration that the festival has become.

Because Juan, as Joshua Redman so neatly put it, "is a real festival, not a series of concerts. A real community that reunites each year in a specific venue at a specific time. Everyone is there, united by the same passion. Jazz is a physical experience." On the main stage, obviously, but also round about, in the streets and during the "after" sessions, when jazz comes into its own. As John McLaughlin sees it: "Juan-les-Pins is not just a stage. For me it's a legend. Juan-les-Pins is to jazz what Carnegie Hall is to classical music. Every time I ever heard anyone talk about Juan, it was about the peak of the very best in jazz."
1967: Earl Hines & Jimmy Rushing - Blues & Things Music » Jazz » Vocal Jazz
1967: Earl Hines & Jimmy Rushing - Blues & Things
Artist: Earl Hines & Jimmy Rushing
Album: Blues & Things
Label: New World Records
Year: 1967, release: 1996
Format, bitrate: Mp3, 320 kbps
Size: 108 MB
Time: 43:53

Originally the initial release from the Master Jazz label, this fine session was reissued on a New World CD in 1996. Pianist Earl Hines and singer Jimmy Rushing had crossed paths many times through the years, but this was their first joint recording; in addition, this was the first official recording by Hines' 1967-69 quartet, a unit also including Budd Johnson on tenor and soprano, bassist Bill Pemberton and drummer Oliver Jackson. Although getting co-billing, Rushing was really a guest on the date, appearing on just four of the nine numbers. Although he sounds a little raspy on "Exactly Like You," Rushing is otherwise in prime form, also singing "Am I Blue," "Save It Pretty Mama" and a rocking "St. Louis Blues." Hines is typically brilliant on his "One Night In Trinidad" and rollicking on the multi-key "Changin' the Blues," while the underrated Johnson shows just how distinctive he was on both of his horns. Recommended.
~ Scott Yanow, All Music Guide.
2008: Rebirth Brass Band - 25th Anniversary Music » Jazz » Traditional Jazz » New Orleans Jazz
2008: Rebirth Brass Band - 25th Anniversary
Artist: Rebirth Brass Band
Album: 25th Anniversary
Label: Rebirth Brass Band
Year: 2008
Format, bitrate: mp3 @ 256 Kbps
Time: 56:39
Size: 106 Mb

The ReBirth Brass Band is an institution. Formed in 1983, the band has long since graduated from the streets of New Orleans to theaters and festivals all over the world. ReBirth is committed to upholding the tradition of brass bands while at the same time incorporating modern music into their show. Their signature brand of heavy funk has placed them among the worlds top brass bands and they are the hands-down favorite among the younger generation. In reference to the sometimes stringent competition amongst brass bands, Offbeat magazine remarked, its clear that ReBirth, which boasts 10 albums and has traveled the world, is the band to beat
1957: Pepper Adams - Hollywood Quintet Sessions West Coast Jazz, Hard-bop
1957: Pepper Adams - Hollywood Quintet Sessions
Artist: Pepper Adams
Album: Hollywood Quintet Sessions
Label: Fresh Sound Records
Year: 1957 ; release: 2008
Format, bitrate: Mp3, 320kbps
Time: 76:10
Size: 174MB
AMG rating: 1957: Pepper Adams - Hollywood Quintet Sessions

Music in general, jazz in particular, and notably baritone saxophonist Pepper Adams all had a breakthrough year in 1957. Given his New Star award in Down Beat magazine's critics poll and much acclaim working with the Stan Kenton Orchestra, Adams left Detroit that year for important recording sessions on both the East and West Coasts. Teamed here with musicians based in the Los Angeles area, Adams proved as adept at hard bop as with the cool school sound the California jazzmen had established. Two dates from the summer of 1957 (Pepper Adams Quintet for the Mode label and Critics' Choice from Pacific Jazz) feature drummer Mel Lewis on all the cuts, with help from pianists Carl Perkins or Jimmy Rowles, Kenton trumpeters Stu Williamson or Lee Katzman, bassist Leroy Vinnegar, and on the second assemblage fellow Detroiter bassist Doug Watkins. The result is a solid collection of standards and compositions from emerging Motor City jazzmen Tommy Flanagan, Barry Harris, Thad Jones, and Adams. The distinguished sound of the baritone makes for an intriguing partnership alongside the brass of Williamson or Katzman. Five tracks with the Perkins/Williamson combine produced the calypso to hard bop "Muezzin'," with a singing trumpet followed by baritone, and "Freddie Froo," a hard bopper based on the same batting order, both originals by the leader. A spry version of the usually mundane "Unforgettable," a frantic, wow factor-saturated take of "Baubles, Bangles and Beads," and the tender, deep, and mellow "My One and Only Love" round out the first session. Katzman plays very well, trumping his relatively little-known status on three of the next eight tracks. He's excellent taking the lead on Flanagan's now legendary "Minor Mishap," adds to the breezy cool of "High Step" from the pen of Harris, and assists the band in bright, inventive, and adroit 4/4 to 3/4 time changes during the Thad Jones number "5021." Rowles in particular consistently stands out for his inserted solo segments on "5021," and manhandles the other Thad Jones contribution, a furious flyer titled "Zec," in a way original boppers Charlie Parker and Miles Davis would be envious of. His piano leads are simply elegant and refined on two more originals written by Adams: on the bluesy "Four Funky Folk" (originally on the World Pacific LP Blowin' the Blues) and especially during his feature on "Blackout Blues." Of course, Mel Lewis is the consummate professional with every swinging note. But the star here is Adams, emerging with brimming confidence and a solid concept beyond his peers and influences, and exhibiting a style that perfectly reflects his highly intelligent, dry, quick-witted, and fluid personality. For fans and students of the big horn, this is a homework project, and a testament to one of the greatest players of all time on his instrument.
~ Michael G. Nastos, All Music Guide
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