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Jazz Blues Club » Articles for 28.06.2011
1969: Guy Lafitte - Blues Music » Jazz » BeBop » Cool
1969: Guy Lafitte - Blues
Artist: Guy Lafitte
Album: Blues
Label: EmArCy
Year: 1969; release: 2007
Format, bitrate: mp3, 320 kbps
Time: 37:58
Size: 86 mb


Guy Lafitte was a French jazz tenor saxophonist born at Saint-Gaudens, France, most notable for his work with Mezz Mezzrow from 1951-1952 and having toured with Big Bill Broonzy in 1951. In 1954 Lafitte made Paris his home, and worked with Lionel Hampton and Emmett Berry. Lafitte had also been a collaborator on various other projects with musicians such as Wild Bill Davis and Bill Coleman.
1964: Dave Brubeck - Dave Brubeck In Berlin Cool, West Coast Jazz
1964: Dave Brubeck - Dave Brubeck In Berlin
Artist: Dave Brubeck
Album: Dave Brubeck In Berlin
Label: Columbia CBS 62578 japanese pressing
Year: 1964; release: 1999
Format, bitrate: mp3@320 kbit/s
Time: ~34 min
Size: 79 MB (with covers front/back HD)


One of the hardest albums to acquire for most Dave Brubeck fans is In Berlin, a 1964 concert by his quartet released only in Germany by CBS. Since the set list includes two songs that were recorded at the 1963 Carnegie Hall concert, that may be why it wasn't also issued in the United States by Columbia, though the performances are sufficiently different and well played. Desmond is witty as usual in "St. Louis Blues," though Brubeck adds an amusing Charlie Parker lick in his solo and bassist Eugene Wright also shines. Brubeck's "Koto Song," which had just been recorded a few months earlier for the LP Jazz Impressions of Japan, gave the audience a taste of something new. The composer's economical solo contrasts with his supposed reputation for heavy-handed playing. The group's breezy rendition of "Take the 'A' Train" is followed by the inevitable "Take Five." Recorded for radio broadcast by WDR Cologne, the commercial release was an afterthought following the concert, when Brubeck asked about the possibility. Briefly reissued on CD, though only in Europe, this enjoyable release remains a difficult acquisition. ~ Ken Dryden, All Music Guide
2010: Mike Pride's From Bacteria to Boys - Betweenwhile Post-bop, Contemporary Jazz, Modern Jazz, Avantgarde
2010: Mike Pride's From Bacteria to Boys - Betweenwhile Artist: Mike Pride's From Bacteria to Boys
Album: Betweenwhile
Label: AUM Fidelity
Year: 2010
Format, bitrate: mp3, 320
Size: 122 mb
Downbeat Rating: 2010: Mike Pride's From Bacteria to Boys - Betweenwhile

Down Beat (p.62) - "Alternating between melodicism, some infectious lyricism and rambunctious stretches of off-kilter jazz and free expressions...BETWEENWHILE keeps you guessing."

"Betweenwhile shows us one sure-fire way to make a sizzling jazz record in 2010: gather a group of stellar musicians, add copious amounts of humor, and have a blast." - 8 out of 10 - Michael Karban, Popmatters

Even though drummer/composer Mike Pride has appeared on over 70 albums, ranging from avant rock to blues, he remains not as well-known as he might be in the jazz field. Betweenwhile is likely to change that. Pride's From Bacteria to Boys has existed in various lineups since 2005, but the current foursome first came together in 2009 and clicked immediately. Although the drummer's collaborators exhibit a similarly eclectic work ethic (with the likes of saxophonist Darius Jones, a rising star of avant jazz but equally comfortable in speed-metal-meets-free-jazz collective Little Women), everyone bends to Pride's conception.
The whole band negotiates Pride's constructs so smoothly that listening with half an ear might suggest that this was yet another modern mainstream outing, but that would be to miss the subversive nature of what Pride is attempting here. It is contemporary mainstream seen through a distorting lens: nothing is quite as it seems. In a program of ten cuts, nine stem from the leader's pen, with the odd man out being by his friend reedman Uli Kempendorff. Multi-sectioned compositions are interspersed with more straightforward numbers. Perhaps the only clue that this is a drummer-led group comes from the expansive metric wit, drawing from the hip hop to R&B that Pride incorporates so deftly into a jazz context, reminiscent of pianist Craig Taborn's rhythmically charged trio with Gerald Cleaver behind the trap set.
Sandwiching the meat of the set are two versions of the enigmatic "Kancamagus," the first being a slow burner for piano trio, while the closer brings Jones onboard in an open ballad. Though sounding like something Bill Evans might be proud of, as Sam Mickens' enthusiastic and illuminating liners explain, the writing integrates tone rows along with interpolations of "My One And Only Love," which might account for the piece's otherworldly ambience. Other compositional oddities include "Bole: the Mouth of What?," where Jones' and pianist Alexis Marcelo's asymmetric reiterations are based on precise transcriptions of carnival barkers from Prides' Maine childhood home. Now it's not necessary to know any of this to appreciate the music, but it confirms a fertile imagination, seeking new ways to go beyond the quotidian. More traditional structures include the distilled hard bop of "Rose," with Marcelo spraying sparkling piano droplets at a sprightly tempo, and the wittily titled "Emo Hope," featuring Jones in a plaintive and tender alto saxophone discourse.
Everyone plays within themselves, but in a good way, making easy transitions between the written and the extemporized, in the context of the tight arrangements. Marcelo, who is veteran reedman Yusef Lateef's pianist of choice, shows himself to be deserving of wider recognition, most ably demonstrated on "It Doesn't Stop," where his jazzy lines fragment and fracture into dissonance, unheeded by the onrushing beat. Kempendorff's "Surcharge" draws the most animated performance of the set, with Marcelo's rippling solo degenerating into pummeling bursts which Cecil Taylor would recognize, and Jones unfettered alto culminating in gobbling multiphonics. Elsewhere the saxophonist sticks within more conventional registers, but still weights his notes with a broad soulful vibrato.
This is a disc likely to be there or thereabouts when those yearend lists get enumerated.

~ John Sharpe, All About Jazz
Victor Feldman - Biography Biography
Victor Feldman - Biography









1960-1961: Victor Feldman - Merry Olde Soul Music » Jazz » BeBop » Cool
1960-1961: Victor Feldman - Merry Olde Soul
Artist: Victor Feldman
Album: Merry Olde Soul
Label: Riverside/OJC (Limited edition)
Years: 1960-1961; release: 1992
Quality: MP3@320 kbps
Size: 90,2 mb
Total time: 40:48


Victor Feldman's one Riverside date as a leader (which has been reissued on CD) features him playing piano on five songs and vibes on four others (three of which add Hank Jones on piano). Joined by bassist Sam Jones and drummer Louis Hayes (both of whom were at the time, with Feldman, the rhythm section of the Cannonball Adderley Quintet), Feldman is in excellent form on a straight-ahead set. The trio/quartet performs five standards that for the most part are not overly familiar, plus four of the leader's originals. Tasteful and swinging music. ~ Scott Yanow, All Music Guide
2011: Laura Fygi - The Best Is Yet To Come Music » Jazz » Vocal Jazz
2011: Laura Fygi - The Best Is Yet To Come
Artist: Laura Fygi
Album: The Best Is Yet To Come
Year: 2011
Label: T2 Entertainment
Format, bitrate: Mp3, 320 kbps
Time: 51:00
Size: 114 Mb

Laura Fygi - 20 years: You can expect plenty more from me!
For the first time in her colourful career, Laura Fygi has recorded an album accompanied by a big band. On the advent of her 20th anniversary as a solo artist, its a dream that has turned reality.
Everywhere that Laura Fygi visits, she is a veritable vision of exotica. In her home country of the Netherlands, they know her as the woman who was raised in Uruguay as the daughter of an Egyptian belly dancer; in the Far East she is the emancipated Western lady who many others aspire to be. But wherever she may be, theres one common factor in all of those locations: that instantly recognisable voice which has won her hearts all over the globe.
>>>>>
2008: Spok Frevo Orquestra - Passo De Anjo Ao Vivo Music » Jazz » Latin » Brazilian Jazz
2008: Spok Frevo Orquestra - Passo De Anjo Ao Vivo
Artist: Spok Frevo Orquestra
Album: Passo De Anjo Ao Vivo
Label: Biscoito Fino
Year: 2008
Format, bitrate: MP3, 192 Kbps
Time: 70:35
Size: 94,8 MB

Frevo is an northeastern brazilian rhythm, brass and drums, traditionally for street dancing in carnival, pretty much like traditional new orleans style, albeit there isn't any known contact between these musicians (frevo is more than a hundred years old)
This album is a great achievment for the genre, with a large ensemble, and great soloing and guests, and i recomend not only for the music, but for understanding why some call pernambuco (the brazilian state) the brazilian new orleans.
2001: Avram Fefer - Calling All Spirits Music » Jazz » Modern Jazz » Avantgarde
2001: Avram Fefer - Calling All Spirits
Artist: Avram Fefer Trio
Album: Calling All Spirits
Label: Cadencejazz
Year: 2001
Format, bitrate: Mp3 256 kbps
Time: 60:26
Size: 101.51 MB

Three things strike the listener immediately upon hearing this recording. The first is the big tone that Avram Fefer projects on saxophone, particularly on the opening tune, an unusual version of Mingus' "Orange Was the Color of Her Dress" in which Fefer recalls the cavernous sound of Coleman Hawkins. The second is Fefer's sense of melody. The saxophonist has little difficulty exposing himself in front of only bass and drums, a risky business to be sure, but one in which he appears comfortable, in part due to his grasp of a song's essence. Which brings you to the third characteristic, his ability to take a familiar (or at least seemingly familiar) song and turn it inside out without emasculating its essence. Now, these factors alone do not in themselves make for a great recording, but when combined with some very fine improvising by all three members of the trio and a real sense of each player listening closely to the others, the results are sure to please. Other than the last piece, which has Fefer the tenor saxophonist duo-ing with Fefer the bass clarinetist in a display of careful overdubbing in an odd meter, there are no gimmicks or unconventional techniques. Rather, there is consistently creative arranging, a strong choice of tunes, and good blowing. More than decent fare.
~ Steve Loewy, All Music Guide
1963: Giorgio Buratti Quartet - Jazz Forms For Export Music » Jazz » BeBop » Hard-bop
1963: Giorgio Buratti Quartet  - Jazz Forms For Export
Artist: Giorgio Buratti Quartet
Album: Jazz Forms For Export
Label: Durium
Year: 1963
Format, bitrate: Mp3, VBR 192-256 kbps
Time: 41:24
Size: 55:63



Giorgio Buratti (Milan, May 21, 1935), Italian bass player and his quartet
Enjoy!!!
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